Workshops and conferences

  VICTOR HUGO:
The writer, the poet, the politician, the lover


   Please REGISTER AT LEAST 24 HOURS IN ADVANCE by calling The French Class at (415) 362-3666

Presented in French by Laurence Delahaye
Best for Levels 5 to 8
$29

The same conference is offered twice at The French Class:

 Wednesday, April 3rd from 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
 Saturday, April 6th from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Hugo was not just the famous author of Les Misérables. He had numerous talents and passions. Discover one of the most influential figures of the 19th century and how the world famous writer played a major role in French politics. Photographs and texts will show not only the public persona, but also the son, the husband, the father and ... the lover.

 BISTROTS! AN ICONIC FRENCH INSTITUTION


Please REGISTER AT LEAST 24 HOURS IN ADVANCE by calling The French Class at (415) 362-3666

Presented in French by Renée Morel
Best for Levels 6 to 8
$25

The same conference is offered three times at The French Class:

Monday, April 8th from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, April 11th from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Saturday, April 13th from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Like strikes, fast trains or beaujolais nouveau, bistrots are identified with the French. They have become a unique way of life. From the late 18th Century to our blighted fast-food era, the bistrot or eatery offering a full bar, comfort food and continuous service for a reasonable price, has been a place for relaxation, conversation or seduction. Discover, through works of art, the history of famous literary cafés, such as the Procope, made famous by Benjamin Franklin, Diderot, Voltaire and Verlaine; the fashionable Café Tortoni, loved by the dandy, the demi-mondaine, and Manet—a common setting in novels from Balzac to Proust; the Flore, or the Coupole associated with Montparnasse and Hemingway, or the Deux Magots in Saint-Germain-des-Prés, immortalized by Sartre and Beauvoir in the heydays of existentialism.

  LE PALAIS DU TROCADÉRO (1878-1936)


Please REGISTER AT LEAST 24 HOURS IN ADVANCE by calling The French Class at (415) 362-3666

Presented in French by Renée Morel
Best for Levels 6 to 8
$25

The same conference is offered three times at The French Class:

Monday, April 15th from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, April 18th from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Saturday, April 20th from 10:30 p.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Erased from the Paris cityscape as well as from memories, the fabled Palais du Trocadéro was an elaborate, eclectic and rather preposterous construction from the second half of the 19th Century, Moorish and Neo-Byzantine in its inspiration. Its architect, Gabriel Davioud, a colleague of Baron Haussmann, designed it for the 1878 Exposition universelle on a hill across the Seine from where the Eiffel Tower now stands. This massive palace meant to last forever was dismantled in 1936 for a World Fair the following year. It housed, among others, a Museum of French Monuments, an Ethnographic Museum, an astronomical Observatory, a most exotic Aquarium, and the largest Concert Hall in the capital. The Palais du Trocadéro, with its dome, huge wings, terrace, sculptures and array of fountains, can be seen in countless postcards and paintings. Come and visit this amazing piece of le Paris disparu that many people want to see rebuilt.

 JAMES TISSOT (1836-1902), JAPONISME AND NOUVEAUX RICHES FROM THE INDUSTRIAL ERA


Please REGISTER AT LEAST 24 HOURS IN ADVANCE by calling The French Class at (415) 362-3666

Presented in French by Renée Morel
Best for Levels 6 to 8
$25

The same conference is offered three times at The French Class:

Monday, April 22nd from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday,April 25th from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Saturday, April 27th from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

In 2011, the Musée d’Orsay in Paris purchased a Tissot work for a staggering four million euros. But who was he? Born in Nantes to a wealthy draper, Jacques Tissot (1836-1902), enamored with everything English, changed his first name to James before studying art in Paris, where he met Degas, Manet, and Whistler. The young artist quickly abandoned medieval scenes for the depiction of modern life and explored japonisme, like Monet. In 1871, having fought in the Franco-Prussian War, Tissot moved to London, where he quickly became a successful society portraitist (mostly catering to nouveaux riches from the Industrial Revolution). However, in 1882, after Kathleen Newton, the divorcée who was his muse and model, succumbed to tuberculosis, the painter, devastated, went back to Paris, where he portrayed different types of women as well as Biblical scenes.

Call to sign up for a class (415) 362-3666